The Best Monitors For Your Money: Spring 2012

| April 5, 2012 | (26)

The Best Monitors For Your Money?

By that, we mean the monitors that offer the best performance and the best features at a given price. Why would you want that, you ask?

Because you want the monitor that offers the best gaming performance and the best features possible for your hard-earned money, right?

If you have the time to do research… but who does in this busy world?

Reading detailed monitor reviews and specs can be a lot of fun. However, most of us don’t have the time to do that and just want the answers. In other words, what you want to know is what is the best monitor for your budget.

So if you don’t have the time to do the research, or just don’t care to do it, don’t worry. We’ll come to your help with this article.

ASUS VH236H

The ASUS VH236H, the best monitor for $175.

Monitors Specifications:

If you’re already comfortable with terms such as resolutions, panel types (TN, VA, IPS, etc.), CFL vs LED backlight, response time, matte vs glossy, inputs, ergonomics and the like, feel free to jump right into our recommendations below.

Otherwise, I invite you to read and understand the terms below, before choosing a monitor.

- Size: The size of the monitor, from one diagonal corner to another.
- Resolution: The number of pixels displayed by the monitor, wide by height. The higher it is, the more things can be displayed at once. Higher resolution also results in higher image quality in video games, but an higher resolution is also more demanding on the video card.
- Panel type:

  • TN panels are found on budget monitors, have the fastest response times, but suffer from inferior color reproduction, contrast ratios and viewing angles.
  • S-PVA/MVA/VA panels are found on mid-range monitors, offer better color reproduction and viewing angles than TN panels, have slightly worse response times than TN or IPS, offer the best contrast ratios and may suffer from color shifting or input lag.
  • IPS panels are found on mid-range and high-end monitors and are generally considered the best all around panel type, offering the best color reproduction and viewing angles. Input lag varies from excellent to poor, depending on the monitor.
  • For more information on the pros and cons of each panel type, I invite you to read LCD Panel Technology Explained, from PC Hardware Help.

- CFL or LED Backlight: Simpy put, LED backlit monitors consume less power than their CFL backlit counter-parts.
- Response time: Lower is better.
- Matte or Glossy: A glossy finish will reflect light, while a matte will not. Colors usually look better with a glossy finish and contrast is usually slightly higher with a glossy finish.
- Inputs: Which types of cable connections are accepted by the monitor. Examples being: D-SUB (VGA), DVI, HDMI, Displayport, etc.
- Ergonomics: This refers to possible physical adjustments of the monitor, in relation to the stand. If you want your monitor at the right height/angle to keep the right posture while being at your computer, this can make all the difference. Then again, you can go with a 3rd-party monitor stand if your monitor’s stand cannot be adjusted in ways that you want, assuming that it has VESA support.
- Speakers: While some monitors are equipped with speakers, consider them last resort solutions, due to their poor sound quality and general lack of power.
- VESA Support: If you want to mount your monitor on the wall, or on an after-market stand, make sure that it supports VESA and to match the size of the mounts of the monitor and wall mount/stand.

What about brightness and contrast?
Manufacturers are notoriously known for coming up with completely ridiculous values for brightness and especially contrast, so I simply didn’t bother reporting values that are more often than not unrealistic.

Learn more about specifications:
Our goal with this article is to fly over the important specifications that you need to understand to choose the best monitor for your needs, while keeping it simple enough for the average user to understand and to keep this article’s length reasonable. If you want to learn more about each specification in details, I invite you to consult the specifications guide over at Tft Central.

A few reminders:

We’ll use this opportunity to remind you that this article is only a guideline for the prices we’ve seen on April 5th 2012. Here are a few things to keep in mind when you read this article:

  1. This list is based on the best U.S. prices from NewEgg, Amazon or the manufacturer’s website. Prices and availability change everyday. We can’t keep up with accurate pricing everyday, but we’ll suggest to you great monitors that you won’t regret buying at the price ranges that we list.
  2. All prices are based on new monitors prices, no refurbished or open box monitors are listed; they might be a good deal, but they come with trade offs, such as missing accessories, higher failure rate, limited return policy, limited warranty, limited availability, etc.

The Best Budget Monitors: $100-$200

The Best Monitor for up to $100:

Acer S200HL Abd 20" Class Widescreen LED Monitor$90 – Acer S200HLAbd

- Price: $90
- Size: 20″
- Resolution: 1600 x 900
- Panel type: TN
- CFL or LED Backlight: LED
- Response time: 5ms
- Matte or Glossy: Glossy
- Inputs: 1x D-SUB (VGA), 1x DVI
- Included cables: VGA and DVI cables
- Ergonomics: Tilt: -5°~ 15°
- Speakers: None
- VESA Support: No
- Warranty: 3 years.

Pros:
For only $90, you get a monitor that offers a 1600 x 900 resolution, a 5ms response time, LED backlight (reduced power consumption), VGA/DVI inputs, included VGA/DVI cables and HDCP support.

Cons:

  1. Not a Full HD 1080p (1920 x 1080 monitor)
  2. No HDMI input
  3. Limited ergonomics adjustment
  4. No support for VESA mounting
  5. Limited viewing angles due to the TN panel

Ideal for:

  1. A budget Gaming PC Tier 0.625 to Tier 1.
  2. Anyone looking for a low-cost monitor
  3. Someone who wants a reasonably sized (20″) monitor.

5:4 ratio alternative monitor:

The Best Monitor for $125 to $150:

Acer G235H Abd 23-Inch Screen LCD Monitor$130 – Acer G235H

- Price: $130
- Size: 23″
- Resolution: 1920 x 1080
- Panel type: TN
- CFL or LED Backlight: CFL
- Response time: 5ms
- Matte or Glossy: Glossy
- Inputs: 1x D-SUB (VGA), 1x DVI
- Included cables: VGA and DVI cables
- Ergonomics: Tilt
- Speakers: No
- VESA Support: 100x100mm
- Warranty: 3 year

Pros:
For $130, you get a 23″ Full HD 1080p 1920 x 1080 monitor, a 5ms response time, VGA/DVI inputs, included VGA/DVI cables, VESA mounting support and HDCP support.

Cons:

  1. CFL backlight resulting in higher power consumption vs LED backlight.
  2. No HDMI input
  3. Limited ergonomics adjustment
  4. Limited viewing angles due to the TN panel

Ideal for:
Anyone looking for a low-cost 1080p (1920 x 1080 resolution) monitor. The lack of HDMI port might bother some, but keep in mind that you can simply use a HDMI to DVI cable or adapter.

Alternatives:

  • $146 – Acer V223W EJBD 22″ 1680 x 1050 Matte – Ideal if you want a low-cost monitor with a matte screen and a decent resolution.
  • $144- Acer S231HL 23″ 1920 x 1080 HDMI – This monitor offers a 1920 x 1080 resolution, with HDMI/DVI/VGA inputs and HDMI/DVI/VGA cables included. It also comes with LED backlight. On the downside, it has a rather flimsy stand and average reviews, hence why it’s not my main recommendation vs the ASUS VH236H above.

The Best Monitor for $175:

ASUS VH236H 23 Inch Widescreen LCD Monitor - Black$160- ASUS VH236H

- Price: $160
- Size: 23″
- Resolution: 1920 x 1080
- Panel type: TN
- CFL or LED Backlight: CFL
- Response time: 2ms
- Matte or Glossy: Glossy
- Inputs: 1x D-SUB (VGA), 1x DVI, 1x HDMI
- Included cables: VGA and DVI cables
- Ergonomics: Tilt: -5°~ 15°
- Speakers: Yes, 2 x 2W
- VESA Support: 100x100mm
- Warranty: 3 years

Pros:
For $160, you get a 23″ 1920 x 1080 monitor with a 2ms response time, VGA/DVI/HDMI inputs, included VGA/DVI cables, VESA mounting support and HDCP support.

Cons:

  1. CFL backlight resulting in higher power consumption vs LED backlight.
  2. Limited ergonomics adjustment
  3. Limited viewing angles due to the TN panel

Ideal for:
Anyone looking for a low-cost monitor with a low response time (2ms). Great for Budget Gaming PCs Tier 1/2 or a Mainstream/High-End Gaming PC, for games that demand a low response time.

Alternative:

The Best Monitor for $200:

LG IPS225T-BN Black 21.5" 8ms  Widescreen LED-Backlit IPS LCD Monitor 250 cd/m2 DFC 5M:1$200 – LG IPS225T-BN

- Price: $200
- Size: 21.5″
- Resolution: 1920 x 1080
- Panel type: E-IPS
- CFL or LED Backlight: LED
- Response time: 8ms
- Matte or Glossy: Matte
- Inputs: 1x D-SUB (VGA), 1x DVI
- Included cables: VGA and DVI cables
- Ergonomics: Tilt
- Speakers: Yes
- VESA Support: No
- Warranty: 1 year

Pros:
For $200, you get a 21.5″ 1920 x 1080 monitor with a matte E-IPS panel for great viewing angles and color accuracy, LED backlighting, VGA and DVI inputs, includes a VGA and a DVI cable.

I was originally going to recommend the AOC I2353PH, a 23″ E-IPS monitor with great color accuracy, pretty good input latency, superb looks (brushed aluminum bezel/base, 9.2mm thick), VGA/2x HDMI inputs and VESA support, after reading great reviews about it and buying one for myself, but it pretty much went out of stock at all major retailers yesterday for some reason.

If you shop around, say on Ebay, you should be able to snag one for $190-200. Alternatively, it might come back in stock sometime in the future (I sure hope so). At that price, it’s a steal for a monitor with excellent performance and great looks!

Cons:

  1. Limited ergonomics adjustment
  2. No VESA support
  3. Average response time, fine for gaming but not so much for FPS
  4. No HDMI input, but you can use a DVI to HDMI cable or adapter
  5. Only a 1-year warranty, compared to 3 years for most monitors. Newegg is currently offering a free 1 yr warranty extension, as part of a limited-time offer.

Ideal for:
Anyone looking for a 21.5″ monitor with great viewing angles, good color accuracy and LED backlightning. Great for Budget Gaming PCs Tier 1/2 or a Mainstream Gaming PC, for games that don’t demand a low input latency (so avoid for FPS games). Also a great choice for a Budget/Mainstream Workstation, where viewing angles and color accuracy matter.

The Best Mainstream Monitors: $250-$400

The Best Monitor for $250:

24" WS LCD 1920X1080 B243H VGA DVI Black 2ms$235 – Acer B243HAJbdr

- Price: $235
- Size: 24″
- Resolution: 1920 x 1080
- Panel type: TN
- CFL or LED Backlight: CFL
- Response time: 2ms
- Matte or Glossy: Glossy
- Inputs: 1x D-SUB (VGA), 1x DVI
- Included cables: VGA and DVI cables
- Ergonomics: Height, Pivot, Swivel, Tilt
- Speakers: No
- VESA Support: 100x100mm
- Warranty: 3 years.

Pros:
For $235, you get a rather slim 24″ 1920 x 1080 monitor with a 2ms response time, LED backlighting, VGA/DVI inputs, included VGA/DVI cables, VESA mounting support, HDCP support and full ergonomics adjustments (Height, Pivot, Swivel, Tilt).

Cons:

  1. No HDMI input.
  2. CFL backlight resulting in higher power consumption vs LED backlight.
  3. Limited viewing angles due to the TN panel

Ideal for:
Anyone looking for a low-cost 24″ monitor with a low response time (2ms) and full ergonomics adjustments. Great for Budget Gaming PCs Tier 1/2 or a Mainstream/High-End Gaming PC, for games that demand a low response time.

Alternatives:

The Best Monitor for $300:

Samsung P2770FH 27-Inch Full HD LCD Monitor (Rose Black)$299 – SAMSUNG P2770FH ToC 27″ 1ms 1920 x 1080

- Price: $299
- Size: 27″
- Resolution: 1920 x 1080
- Panel type: TN
- CFL or LED Backlight: CFL
- Response time: 1ms
- Matte or Glossy: Matte
- Inputs: 1x DVI, 1x HDMI
- Included cables: DVI and DVI to VGA cables
- Ergonomics: Tilt: -5°~ 15°
- Speakers: None
- VESA Support: No
- Warranty: 3 years.

Pros:
For $299, you get a large 27″ 1920 x 1080 matte monitor with a 1ms response time, HDMI/DVI inputs, included DVI and DVI to VGA cables and HDCP support.

Cons:

  1. Limited ergonomics adjustment
  2. No VESA mounting support
  3. CFL backlight resulting in higher power consumption vs LED backlight.
  4. Limited viewing angles due to the TN panel

Ideal for:
Anyone looking for a 27″ monitor with an ultra-low response time (1ms). Great for Budget Gaming PCs Tier 1/2 or a Mainstream/High-End Gaming PC, for games that demand an ultra-low response time.

Alternatives:

The Best Monitor for $350-400:

ASUS VG236H 23-Inch 120 Hz 3D Ready Panel Monitor with nVidia 3D Vision Kit - Black$370 – ASUS VG236H 23″ 2ms 120Hz 1920 x 1080 Glossy Nvidia 3D Vision included glasses

- Price: $370
- Size: 23″
- Resolution: 1920 x 1080
- Panel type: TN
- CFL or LED Backlight: CFL
- Response time: 2ms
- Matte or Glossy: Matte
- Inputs: 1x DVI, 1x HDMI, Component
- Included cables: DVI
- Ergonomics: Height, Swivel and Tilt
- Speakers: None
- VESA Support: Yes, 100mm x 100mm
- Warranty: 3 years.

Pros:
For $370, you get a 23″ 1920 x 1080 matte monitor with a 120Hz refresh rate, support for Nvidia 3D Vision (with included glasses), HDMI/DVI inputs, included DVI and DVI to VGA cables and HDCP support.

Cons:

  1. CFL backlight resulting in higher power consumption vs LED backlight.
  2. Limited viewing angles due to the TN panel

Ideal for:
Anyone looking for a 23″ monitor with a 120Hz refresh rate and Nvidia 3D Vision support, with included glasses. Great for a Mainstream or a High-End Gaming PC, for games that demand an ultra-fast refresh rate.

Alternatives:

  • $340 – Dell UltraSharp U2412M 24″ 8ms IPS Panel 1920 x 1200 USBx4 VGA/DVI/Displayport – If you want a 1920 x 1200 monitor with an IPS panel, VGA/DVI/Displayport connections and a stand that supports height, tilt, pivot and swivel, the Dell UltraSharp U2412M is a great alternative. On the downside, the  is a hit or miss feature, some people cannot stand it. By buying it at Amazon, you can easily return it if you cannot stand the anti-glare coating.
  • $310 – Dell ST2220T 21.5″ touchscreen 1920 x 1080 IPS panel VGA/DVI/HDMI 3x USB – Want a touchscreen with an IPS panel? The Dell ST2220T is an excellent choice.
  • $374 – HP ZR24w – Versus the Dell UltraSharp U2412M, the HP ZR24w doesn’t need as much tweaking to get accurate colors, only to lower the brightness. While the HP isn’t recommended to avid gamers, the Dell is to avoid completely for gamers, with even worse response time and ghosting. Finally, while the HP ZR24w is a matte monitor, it’s not equipped with the problematic anti-glare coating found on the Dell, which some people cannot stand. In the end, all these points give me no choice but to recommend the HPZR24w over the Dell UltraSharp U2412M, if you want a 1920 x 1200 monitor with a S-IPS panel.

The Best High-End Monitors: $450 and more

The Best Monitor from $450 to $600:

ASUS PA246Q 24-Inch Wide LCD Monitor - Black$498 – ASUS PA246Q

- Price: $498
- Size: 24.1″
- Resolution: 1920 x 1200
- Panel type: P-IPS 30 bit (10-bit per color channel)
- CFL or LED Backlight: CFL
- Response time: 6ms
- Matte or Glossy: Matte
- Inputs: 1x D-SUB (VGA), 1x DVI, 1x HDMI, 1x Displayport
- Included cables: VGA, DVI and Displayport cables
- Ergonomics: Height, Pivot, Swivel, Tilt
- Speakers: No
- VESA Support: 100x100mm
- Warranty: 3 years.

Pros:

For $498, you get a 24.1″ 1920 x 1200 matte monitor with a P-IPS 30 bit (10-bit per color channel) panel for great viewing angles, great color space coverage (covers 98% of the Adobe-RBG color space, according to ASUS), color accuracy, VGA, DVI, HDMI and Displayport inputs and full ergonomic adjustments possible.

Cons:

  1. CFL backlight resulting in higher power consumption vs LED backlight.
  2. Average response time

Ideal for:
Anyone looking for a 1920 x 1200 monitor with a 30 bit (10-bit per color channel) P-IPS panel for great viewing angles, color space coverage and color accuracy. Great for a Workstation or a Gaming PC that doesn’t need the fastest response time.

Alternatives:

The Best Monitor from $850 to $1250:

HP ZR30w 30-inch S-IPS LCD Monitor$1107 – HP ZR30w 30″ S-IPS 2560 x 1600 DVI/Displayport USB Hub

- Price: $1107
- Size: 30″
- Resolution: 2560 x 1600
- Panel type: S-IPS 30 bit (10-bit per color channel)
- CFL or LED Backlight: CFL
- Response time: 7 ms (GTG), 12 ms (on/off)
- Matte or Glossy: Matte
- Inputs: 1x DVI Dual-Link, 1x Displayport, 4x USB 2.0
- Included cables: 1x Dual-Link DVI, 1x Displayport, 1x USB cables
- Ergonomics: Height, Tilt and Swivel
- Speakers: None, HP Speaker Bar optional
- VESA Support: Yes, 100mm x 100mm
- Warranty: 3 years.

Pros:

  1. 30-bit S-IPS panel that covers a staggering 111% of the Adobe RBG Color space, according to this AnandTech’s review of the HP ZR30w.
  2. Height, Tilt and Swivel adjustments possible
  3. 30″ with a 2560 x 1600 resolution
  4. Lowest input latency for a very-high resolution monitor, making it also a great choice for gamers who want a 2560 x 1600 monitor without suffering from too much latency.

Cons:

  1. Cost: $1100
  2. Limited connections: Only one Dual-Link DVI and one Displayport input.
  3. Requires a video card that outputs via a dual-link DVI port or a Displayport, like any other very-high resolution monitor.
  4. High power consumption, due to its large size, high resolution and use of CFL backlight.
  5. No Pivot adjustment possible without buying a stand.

Ideal for:
A professional who needs accurate color and tone reproduction, for any color and tone critical workflow, including photography, video, film, industrial design, and graphic arts. With its low input lag, it’s also a very good monitor for a gamer who want to game at a resolution of 2560 x 1600 on a single monitor.

Alternative

  • $827 – Dell UltraSharp U2711 27″ Matte 2560 x 1440 – The Dell Ultrasharp U2711 is a great alternative, if you want a 27″ 2560 x 1440 30-bit S-IPS panel at a low-cost. On the downside, the anti-glare coating is a hit or miss feature, some people cannot stand it. By buying it at Amazon, you can easily return it if you cannot stand the anti-glare coating.
  • $949 – Apple Cinema Display – 27″ 2560 x 1440 Glossy with Thunderbolt – If you want a very high resolution monitor, but with a glossy finish, the Apple Cinema Display is an excellent option. It’s also equipped with LED backlight as opposed to CFL backlight for other very high resolution 27-30″ displays, resulting in a much lower (about 50W at max) power consumption. A major drawback though is that it only accepts a Thunderbolt connection, which is currently only available on Apple Mac computers. This is set to change starting in April though, with the launch on Intel’s Ivy Bridge and various motherboards/laptops that will come with it, with many that should support Thunderbolt.
  • $1268 – UltraSharp U3011 30″ 2560 x 1600 – The HP ZR30w offers a more solid stand, slightly better color performance and lower input latency, according to AnandTech. The U3011 does offers an extra DVI and HDMI port (with 5.1 audio pass through), so if that matters to you, opt for the Dell Ultrasharp U3011. Otherwise, the HP ZE30w is a better monitor overall.

The Best Monitor for $2000+:

30IN LCD 2560X1600 1000$1816 – NEC MultiSync PA301W 30″ 2560 x 1600

- Price: $1816
- Size: 30″
- Resolution: 2560 x 1600
- Panel type: P-IPS 10-bit
- CFL or LED Backlight: CcFL
- Response time: 7 ms (GTG), 12 ms (max)
- Matte or Glossy: Matte
- Inputs: 2 x DVI-D, 2 x DisplayPort 1.1a
- Included cables: 1x Dual-Link DVI, 1x Displayport, 1x USB cables
- Ergonomics: Height, Tilt, Pivot and Swivel
- Speakers: None
- VESA Support: Yes, 100mm x 100mm
- Warranty: 3 years.

Reviewed by AnandTech here, who had this to say about it in their conclusion:
NEC’s new 30-inch display is definitely solid, it’s hard to argue that it isn’t the best 30-inch display – heck, monitor in general – that I’ve tested yet.

In other words, if you are a professional in the animation, game development, film/video post-production, broadcast, product design, and/or graphic arts categories or a consumer/hobbyist for who only the best of the best will do, the NEC PA301W is the way to go.

Currently on sale for $1816, it usually sells for over $2100, if not $2300-2400.

Pros:

  1. 30-bit S-IPS panel that covers a staggering 112% of the Adobe RBG Color space, according to AnandTech’s review.
  2. Height, Tilt, Pivot and Swivel adjustments possible
  3. 30″ with a 2560 x 1600 resolution
  4. Four inputs: Two Dual-Link DVI and two Displayport 1.1a ports.

Cons:

  1. Cost: ~$1800-2400
  2. Requires a video card that outputs via a dual-link DVI port or a Displayport, like any other high-resolution monitor.
  3. High power consumption, due to its large size, high resolution and use of CFL backlight.
  4. Rather high input latency; not ideal for a gamer. The HP ZR30w recommended at the $1100 price point is the best option for a gamer who want a monitor with a 2560 x 1600 resolution.
  5. It’s massive with dimensions(with stand) of: Width (27.1″ (688.0 mm)), Height: (18.4-24.3″ (466.4-646.4 mm)) and Depth (11.9″ (301.6 mm)) and heavy at 41.5 lbs (18.8 kg) with the stand.

Ideal for:
A professional who needs accurate color and tone reproduction, for any color and tone critical workflow, including photography, video, film, industrial design, and graphic arts. With its low input lag, it’s also a very acceptable monitor for a gamer who want to game at a resolution of 2560 x 1600 on a single monitor.

Conclusion:

We hope that you’ve enjoyed this first edition of the Best Monitors For Your Money, a collaboration between Windez, one of our forums member and Mathieu, the editor-in-chief and founder of Hardware Revolution.

Of course, with this being the first edition of the article and this being such a complex article, with many recommendations and alternatives, you may find some typos.

Alternatively, you may believe that there’s a better option than our recommendations.

If that happens, feel free to leave a comment below and remember, you can join us on our forums to discuss with everyone else the monitor that you’re planning to buy, ask your questions and join our helpful community.

Category: The Best PC Parts For Your Money

About Mathieu Bourgie: HR Founder - Computer expert with 13 years of experience in building, fixing and modifying PCs. Over the years, I’ve developed a passion for PC hardware and now I enjoy helping others build their own PCs! In April 2008, I launched Hardware Revolution and ... Read more at my about page .

  • Mauricio

    can ask where the HP Compaq LA2405wg stands on this? not that I’m complaining…. it’s just that I got one because I can set it in portrait position ;-)

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=28004591 Igor Reznik

      same with both the dells, their stands are awesome

  • LazyTriangle

    I just bought a Samsung BX2450 that I found on ebay for $180 (its $280 on newegg). I love it, it is huge, clear picture, led backlit, slim design, shiny v shaped stand plus all the usual 1920 x 1080, 2ms response, HDMI a big upgrade from my previous 15″ LCD

  • Brian

    Always go matte display if you can. Glossy is going to have annoying reflections. Matte displays do tend to have a slightly lower contrast ratio, but overglossing everything nowadays is ridiculous.

  • Tandmmail

    I have a Dell st2210. The stats arn’t too great looking but if you want a 1080p display with a hdmi, vga, and dvi for around $150, then this is great. My computer isn’t too powerful so I can’t say it can handle modern pc games. (Great for minecraft on low settings lol) but it handles anything ps3 throws at it (hdmi).

  • Anonymous

    Who am I Rockefeller , the best monitor for $89 Acer G185 I got two , spent the extra dough on a pair of those flat screen brackets .

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jason-Yuan/100000470693010 Jason Yuan

    Whoa Matt, the cheapest monitor here is 200$… i think some of us consumers would like to know about other monitors that are cheaper….i mean generally most ppl use a 19in screen…giving only 4 price ranges doesn’t help us at all and there should be some more categories for 3D, IPS, LED, and other subjects…..im pretty sure there are some decent monitors between 100-200$…anyway thnx for your article anyways…im not trying to criticize you…your work is almost always very organized and thorough and i appreciate you for that….this article just needs more options….thats all…gj as always

  • Anonymous

    What about 120 Hz aka “3D” monitors? Also, you should discuss screen size in relativity to viewing distance. Great article otherwise.

  • Murph

    I’m confused, which monitors are good for gaming?? Or does it differ depending on the type of gaming?

    • mwhals

       If you read the “Ideal for” about each monitor it tells you if it is good for gaming. Generally, it is the under $400 monitors that are great for gaming. The more expensive monitors are built for color accuracy rather than refresh rate.

  • cerealkiller

    :D
    been waiting for this for a while

  • ricky

    how about ASUS VS248H-P? it’s 184 and change right now in amazon…what’s your opinion on this one?

    • http://www.hardware-revolution.com/ MathieuB

       @3ec571d121b2fac10e5f37fddac7c1f9:disqus

      It’s a good monitor, but it’s hard to justify its cost, with the ASUS VH236H selling for $160 ($140 after MIR) and the $200 E-IPS equipped LG IPS225T-BN.Take care,Mathieu

  • Tom Nieradka

    I’m also curious why you didn’t select the ASUS VS VS238H-P, on newegg now for 170. It’s essentially the same as the monitor that you chose for that price-range, the only major difference being that it has no build in speakers (who uses those anyway) but does have an LED backlight, which you agree to be superior. 

    • http://www.hardware-revolution.com/ MathieuB

       @google-59a1ee3a14c92298371106e6227e584a:disqus

      More than likely due to a price change since my last edit on the article. The ASUS VS VS238H-P is a great choice at that price, even more so with the 10% off promotion.

      I swear, during the time that I was writing the articles, I must have seen at LEAST 50 price changes on various recommended monitors.

      Take care,
      Mathieu

  • Xais Hawj

    As far as CFL vs LED, I found that CFL has more detail in overblown and shadow areas while LED provides a more uniform back lighting? That is what I’ve noticed when comparing to my old CFL displays. Point is, IMHO LED isn’t necessarily always better.

    Thanks,
    Ichigeki

  • Charles Dickey

    “While the HP isn’t recommended to avid gamers, the Dell is to avoid completely for gamers, with even worse response time and ghosting.”

    I’m reading conflicting reports on this. Some articles are saying “response time, yes it’s noticeable through rigorous benchmarking, but you won’t notice the difference to a TN’s response while you’re gaming.”

    What’s your thoughts process on them being worse for gaming in general? (I’m torn as I use my monitor for work and gaming.)

  • lordroy

    I am really glad you started posting articles again, last month you kinda left us hangin…

    Anyway, I would like more info about the pros and cons of CFL vs LED.  I cannot seem to find any real detailed info which is better for gaming/movies/general use.  I understand that “Simpy put, LED backlit monitors consume less power than their CFL backlit counter-parts.” but for most of us, we could not care less about which one “consumes less power” only which one is better for our experience.

    Thanks again for putting these articles out.  I have sent dozens of people from my TS server to your website to get information about a great many things… 

  • Bobvacation

     Best 120hz gaming monitors should be separate category.  
    1.  Alienware 2310
    2.  Planar
    3.  Asus
    4. ?

  • JV

    What’s your opinion on the Asus ML228h monitor? It seems to have everything you could want: 1080, 2ms response, LED lighting, and ultra thin design. Plus, IMO, it is nicely designed. Great job on the article!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Reticuli Benjamin Goulart

    Other sites say the acer g235 is matte and the asus 236h is glossy.

  • Jdandonajr

    Nice article.  Ever think about doing one on touch screen monitors.  Seems like things may head in that direction.  Thanks.
    Joe

  • David Feng

    please update this

  • Senrusho

    You skipped like a 400 gap between 600ish and 1000ish. Why not include the PB287q?

  • Daryl Sew

    Can we have a refresh on this article? :P

  • KSib

    This needs an update haha